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    Big-Little Letter Matching Game

    April 5, 2016 by Brandy Vencel

    Almost four years ago, I debuted my Big-Little Letter Matching Game. It was exactly what I needed to help my letter-learning students make a connection between their big and little letters. For a few months now, I’ve been meaning to update it. When I originally created it, I didn’t know much about design, and you can tell by looking at the game!

    Don’t get me wrong. The original game gets the job done.

    But with all the new design technology available, I’ve been wanting to make something that is nicer, and easier to cut the game pieces into equal sizes (a serious flaw in my original game).

    I especially wanted to do this since I’m ready to begin using the game with my littlest one, O-Age-Five.

    Last week, I saw a copy of my game making the rounds on Pinterest and Facebook. After getting over the shock, it dawned on me that maybe, just maybe, this would save me a lot of work. If the designer had done a good job, I could just refer all of you there, and retire my original game.

    The problem is that I can’t endorse the game.

    Let me quickly explain.

    Fonts created for designers are not the same as fonts we would use in the instruction of children. That is why a lot of us purchase special fonts in order to teach writing.

    So, if you take a really cute font, and put it over manuscript lines, this is what you’ll get:

    My Big-Little Letter Matching Game is perfect for teaching preschoolers their letters and how the big and little letters go together.
    My Big-Little Letter Matching Game is perfect for teaching preschoolers their letters and how the big and little letters go together.

    In order to have the letters appear in the appropriate proportions, it is necessary to use different font sizes for different letters. It is even necessary, sometimes, to change fonts.

    I wish I could have referred you to the copy of my game, but when it comes to this sort of thing, I’m a stickler. Why include the midline, if we aren’t going to use it properly?

    And, of course, the midline is essential for kids that are still mixing up lowercase letters such as b, p, d, and q.

    So. I updated my game. Hurrah!

    A gift to you. See the image at right for a sample — the full game is three pages. I highly recommend you print it on heavy cardstock so that you can play the game over and over before it wears out.

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